Fact Sheet

Heroin-Assisted Treatment (HAT)

February 19, 2014

Under HAT, pharmacological heroin is administered under strict controls in a clinical setting to those who have failed in other treatments like methadone. Every published evaluation of HAT has shown extremely positive outcomes: major reductions in illicit drug use, crime, disease and overdose; and improvements in health, wellbeing, social reintegration and treatment retention. More than a half dozen countries in Europe and Canada have implemented heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) programs.

Stigma and People Who Use Drugs

March 3, 2014

There is an extensive body of literature documenting the stigma associated with alcohol and other drug problems. No physical or psychiatric condition is more associated with social disapproval and discrimination than substance dependence. For people who use drugs, or are recovering from problematic drug use, stigma can be a barrier to a wide range of opportunities and rights.

Benefits for New Jersey Residents with Drug Convictions

January 3, 2014

Getting needed social services and support can be particularly challenging for people with drug convictions.  This fact sheet answers common questions about eligibility for three of the most helpful social support programs: Food Stamps/SNAP, Cash Assistance/GA and Medicaid.

Facts About MDMA ("Ecstasy", "Molly")

May 24, 2013

MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine), commonly referred to as ecstasy or molly, is sold either as a pressed pill taken orally, or as a powder that is snorted or swallowed. People who use ecstasy describe themselves as feeling open, accepting, unafraid and connected to people around them. Before MDMA became popular at clubs and raves, it was utilized for therapeutic purposes by psychologists and other mental health practitioners in the 1970s and early 1980s.

Marijuana Reclassification: Removing Marijuana From the Controlled Substances Act

May 24, 2013

The current system for classifying illegal (and most legal) drugs is flawed, outdated and unscientific. Marijuana should be reclassified in order to facilitate research, ensure patient access, and permit its legal regulation. Established by the federal Controlled Substances Act (CSA) of 1970, this system erroneously places marijuana in the most restrictive class, Schedule I, reserved for drugs with a "high potential for abuse”, "no currently accepted medical use" and a “lack of accepted safety."

Which States Have 911 Good Samaritan Laws and/or Naloxone Access Laws?

August 8, 2014

List of states with 911 Good Samaritan laws and/or naloxone access policies in place.

Map of State Laws Regulating Naloxone

Map of all states with broadened naloxone access laws and links to the text of the various laws.

Bibliography of Recent Overdose Research

February 1, 2013

A list of research and publications from the Harm Reduction Coalition related to overdose that may be helpful when drafting proposals or gathering evidence to show the need for an overdose program. These publications touch on many issues related to overdose, including naloxone, overdose, risk factors, statistics about overdose in different communities, and program evaluations.

Understanding California's 911 Good Samaritan Law

March 1, 2013

On January 1, 2013, California became the tenth state to implement a 911 Good Samaritan overdose fatality prevention law. This law is designed to encourage people to quickly seek medical care for an overdose victim by providing limited protection from arrest, charge and/or prosecution for low-level drug law violations. DPA and our allies spearheaded the passage of this law – and we are now working throughout the state to ensure its effective implementation.

Marijuana Legalization in Washington State and Colorado

February 12, 2014

In November 2012, voters in Colorado and Washington State took the historic step of rejecting the decades-long failed policy of marijuana prohibition by deciding to permit the legal regulation of marijuana sales, cultivation and distribution for adults. This document explains why states can chart a different course without violating federal law, and summarizes the similarities and differences between Colorado and Washington State’s new laws.

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