Racial Disparities in Marijuana Arrests in Virginia (2003-2013)

October 28, 2015

"Racial Disparities in Marijuana Arrests in Virginia (2003-2013)" reveals that marijuana possession arrests in Virginia have increased dramatically in recent years despite a nationwide trend in favor of reforming marijuana laws. Between 2003 and 2013, marijuana arrests in Virginia increased by 76%. Black Virginians have been disproportionately impacted by marijuana law enforcement despite constituting only 20% of the state's population and using marijuana at a similar rate as white Virginians.

A Guide to Prop. 47 Reclassification in Los Angeles County

October 2, 2015

Proposition 47 is a law passed by voter initiative in California on November 4, 2014. Prop. 47 changed certain low-level crimes like drug possession and petty-theft offenses from felonies or wobblers (crimes that could be tried as felonies or misdemeanors) to misdemeanors. The provisions of Prop. 47 apply retroactively (for persons already convicted for these crimes) and going forward for all future criminal adjudications.

Marijuana Legalization in Washington After 1 Year of Retail Sales and 2.5 Years of Legal Possession

July 6, 2015

In November 2012, voters in Washington and Colorado approved the first two laws in the U.S. to end marijuana prohibition and legally regulate marijuana production, distribution and sales. In December 2012, marijuana possession and use by adults 21 years of age and older became legal in Washington. A year-and-a-half later, the first retail marijuana stores opened their doors on July 8, 2014.

Above the Law: An Investigation of Civil Asset Forfeiture in California

April 21, 2015

Above the Law: An Investigation of Civil Asset Forfeiture Abuses in California is a multi-year, comprehensive look at asset forfeiture abuses in California that reveals the troubling extent to which law enforcement agencies have violated state and federal law.  Civil asset forfeiture law allows the government to seize and keep cash, cars, real estate, and any other property – even from citizens never charged with or convicted of a crime.  Because these assets often go straight into the coffers of the enforcement agency, these laws have led to a perversion of police

Marijuana Arrests in Colorado After the Passage of Amendment 64

March 25, 2015

This report provides comprehensive data on marijuana charges and arrests in Colorado before and after the passage of Amendment 64 in 2012. The report compiles and analyzes data from the county judicial districts, as well as various law enforcement agencies via the National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS). The report finds that marijuana arrests have drastically plummeted in Colorado following the passage of Amendment 64.

Marijuana Legalization in Colorado: One-Year Status Report

January 5, 2015

All eyes are on Colorado to gauge the impact of the country’s first-ever state law to tax and regulate the sale of marijuana to adults 21 and older. Since the first retail marijuana stores opened on January 1, 2014, the state has benefitted from a decrease in crime rates, a decrease in traffic fatalities, an increase in tax revenue and economic output from retail marijuana sales, and an increase in jobs.

Race, Class and Marijuana Arrests in Mayor de Blasio's Two New Yorks: the NYPD's Marijuana Arrest Crusade Continues in 2014

October 20, 2014
Drug Policy Alliance | Marijuana Arrest Research Project

A new report documents shows that, despite campaign promises made in 2013, marijuana possession arrests under New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio are on track to equal – or even surpass – the number of arrests under his predecessor, Mayor Michael Bloomberg. The report includes extensive analysis of marijuana arrest and income data, showing  that overall, low income and middle class communities of color face dramatically higher rates of marijuana possession arrests than do white communities of every class bracket.

Taking Control: Pathways to Drug Policies That Work

September 8, 2014
Global Commission on Drug Policy

This report reflects a new evolution in the thinking of the Global Commission, which includes Kofi Annan, Richard Branson, and the former presidents of Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Poland, Portugal and Switzerland. They not only reiterate their demands for decriminalization, alternatives to incarceration, and greater emphasis on public health approaches – but now also call for responsible legal regulation of currently-illegal drugs.

Proposals for alternatives to criminal prosecution and incarceration for drug-related offenses in Latin America

June 1, 2014
International Drug Policy Consortium

Latin America is immersed in a prison epidemic. The so-called “war on drugs” and harsher criminal penalties underlie the increase in the prison population. “One-size-fits-all” policies and severe sanctions have left the region’s countries in a prison crisis that threatens future generations. Instead of proposing a single model, therefore, multiple pathways should be explored.

Status Report: Marijuana Regulation in Colorado After Six Months of Retail Sales and 18 Months of Decriminalization

June 24, 2014

With the passage of Amendment 64 in November 2012, Colorado became the first state to regulate the cultivation, manufacture and sale of marijuana for adults 21 and over. It is far too early to make any definitive declarations about social trends. There are, however, some encouraging signs that have been documented in Colorado since the first retail stores officially opened on Jan. 1, 2014. Some of these trends are outlined below.

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