So Far, So Good: What We Know About Marijuana Legalization in Colorado, Washington, Alaska, Oregon and Washington, D.C.

October 13, 2016

In 2012, Colorado and Washington became the first two U.S. states – and the first two jurisdictions in the world – to approve ending marijuana prohibition and legally regulating marijuana production, distribution and sales. In the 2014 election, Alaska and Oregon followed suit, while Washington D.C. passed a more limited measure that legalized possession and home cultivation of marijuana (but did not address its taxation and sale due to D.C. law).


June 16, 2016

What causes addiction? Easy, right? Drugs cause addiction. But maybe it is not that simple. This video, made by Kurzgesagt, is adapted from Johann Hari's New York Times best-selling book 'Chasing The Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs.' The video highlights the important work of Dr. Bruce Alexander and his Rat Park project, a groundbreaking study into the causes of drug addiction.

Assessing New York’s Medical Marijuana Program: Problems of Patient Access and Affordability

June 13, 2016
New York became the 23rd state to roll out its medical marijuana program on January 7, 2016. The law has been criticized as being one of the most restrictive and burdensome programs in the country. This report, an assessment of the first four months of the program, found that patients and caregivers face significant barriers to accessing medical marijuana.

New Mexico’s Drug Overdose Death Epidemic: Understanding the Problem and Finding a Way Out of the Crisis

June 1, 2016

New Mexico is experiencing an ongoing crisis of drug overdose poisoning deaths. This booklet highlights the state's overdose data, reviews polling results on harm reduction programs, and presents policy recommendations to decrease opioid related overdose.

Marijuana Enforcement Disparities In California: A Racial Injustice

May 31, 2016

New data analyses conducted by the Drug Policy Alliance and ACLU of California find that racial disparities in marijuana policing have persisted, following the reduction of low-level marijuana possession from a misdemeanor to an infraction in 2011.

Racial Disparities in Marijuana Arrests in Virginia (2003-2013)

October 28, 2015

"Racial Disparities in Marijuana Arrests in Virginia (2003-2013)" reveals that marijuana possession arrests in Virginia have increased dramatically in recent years despite a nationwide trend in favor of reforming marijuana laws. Between 2003 and 2013, marijuana arrests in Virginia increased by 76%. Black Virginians have been disproportionately impacted by marijuana law enforcement despite constituting only 20% of the state's population and using marijuana at a similar rate as white Virginians.

A Guide to Prop. 47 Reclassification in Los Angeles County

October 2, 2015

Proposition 47 is a law passed by voter initiative in California on November 4, 2014. Prop. 47 changed certain low-level crimes like drug possession and petty-theft offenses from felonies or wobblers (crimes that could be tried as felonies or misdemeanors) to misdemeanors. The provisions of Prop. 47 apply retroactively (for persons already convicted for these crimes) and going forward for all future criminal adjudications.

Marijuana Legalization in Washington After 1 Year of Retail Sales and 2.5 Years of Legal Possession

July 6, 2015

In November 2012, voters in Washington and Colorado approved the first two laws in the U.S. to end marijuana prohibition and legally regulate marijuana production, distribution and sales. In December 2012, marijuana possession and use by adults 21 years of age and older became legal in Washington. A year-and-a-half later, the first retail marijuana stores opened their doors on July 8, 2014.

Above the Law: An Investigation of Civil Asset Forfeiture in California

April 21, 2015

Above the Law: An Investigation of Civil Asset Forfeiture Abuses in California is a multi-year, comprehensive look at asset forfeiture abuses in California that reveals the troubling extent to which law enforcement agencies have violated state and federal law.  Civil asset forfeiture law allows the government to seize and keep cash, cars, real estate, and any other property – even from citizens never charged with or convicted of a crime.  Because these assets often go straight into the coffers of the enforcement agency, these laws have led to a perversion of police

Marijuana Arrests in Colorado After the Passage of Amendment 64

March 25, 2015

This report provides comprehensive data on marijuana charges and arrests in Colorado before and after the passage of Amendment 64 in 2012. The report compiles and analyzes data from the county judicial districts, as well as various law enforcement agencies via the National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS). The report finds that marijuana arrests have drastically plummeted in Colorado following the passage of Amendment 64.

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