Report

Scenarios for the Drug Problem in the Americas, 2013-2025

May 17, 2013
Organization of American States

The second part of the OAS study is a scenarios report, which presents four possibilities for how drug policy could evolve in the Americas – and what results could be expected with each approach by 2025. Most of the scenarios break from the current U.S.-led drug war approach.  The report is the first of its kind, providing a thoughtful and detailed visualization of alternatives to the existing drug prohibition regime.

The Drug Problem in the Americas: Introduction and Analytical Report

May 17, 2013
Organization of American States

The first of two interconnected reports, this report by the Organization of American States (OAS) comprehensively analyzes drug trends, practices, and policies in the Americas. The report’s basic premise is that there is not just one single “drug problem” in the hemisphere, but rather “many problems”. As such, the report does not present concrete recommendations, but does offer some welcome suggestions, including that “decriminalization of drug use needs to be considered as a core element in any public health strategy.”

An Exit Strategy for the Failed War on Drugs: A Federal Legislative Guide

May 16, 2013

This comprehensive report contains 75 broad and incremental recommendations for federal legislative reforms related to civil rights, deficit reduction, law enforcement, foreign policy, sentencing and reentry, effective drug treatment, public health, and drug prevention education.

Blueprint for a Public Health and Safety Approach to Drug Policy

April 23, 2013

The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM) and the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) jointly researched and drafted a Blueprint for a Public Health and Safety Approach to Drug Policy. We examined New York’s current drug policies and reimagined how those policies could realize better health and public safety outcomes.

Addicted to Punishment: The Disproportionality of Drug Laws in Latin America

January 1, 2013

This report studies criminal laws in seven Latin American countries (Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, Mexico, Colombia, Bolivia, and Argentina) and finds that criminal penalties for nonviolent drug law violations in these countries have grown dramatically – often exceeding prison sentences for violent crimes like rape or murder. The study was conducted by Dejusticia, with support from the Washington Office on Latin America and the Open Society Foundations.

New Jersey Jail Population Analysis: Identifying Opportunities to Safely and Responsibly Reduce the Jail Population

April 8, 2013

A recently-released report finds that New Jersey jails are overflowing with pretrial arrestees who are unable to afford their nominal bail amounts.

One Million Police Hours

March 19, 2013

A new report documents the astronomical number of hours the New York Police Department has spent arresting and processing hundreds of thousands of low-level misdemeanor marijuana possession arrests during Mayor Bloomberg’s tenure from 2002 to 2012. The report finds that NYPD used approximately one million hours of police officer time to make 440,000 marijuana possession arrests. Under Mayor Bloomberg, New York City has made more marijuana possession arrests than under mayors Koch, Dinkins and Giuliani combined.

A Social Work Perspective on Drug Policy Reform

This report commissioned by the National Association of Social Workers calls for a public health approach to drug use and outlines the role social workers can play in shifting the current paradigm.

210,000 Marijuana Possession Arrests in Colorado, 1986 - 2010

October 25, 2012

This report reveals that more than 200,000 people have been arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado since 1986.  Police made more than half of those possession arrests in just the last 10 years.

Other key findings include:

  • Police made 108,000 marijuana possession arrests in just the last ten years.
  • African Americans and Latinos are less than a quarter (23%) of Colorado's residents, they made up more than a third (35%) of the people arrested for marijuana possession.

240,000 Marijuana Arrests: Costs, Consequences, and Racial Disparities of Possession Arrests in Washington, 1986 - 2010

October 11, 2012

This report reveals that nearly a quarter of a million people have been arrested in Washington for marijuana possession from 1986 to 2010.  Police made more than half of those marijuana arrests in just the last 10 years.

Other key findings include:

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