Report

Efficacy and Impact: The Criminal Justice Response to Marijuana Policy in the United States

August 25, 2005
Jason Ziedenberg and Jason Colburn
Justice Policy Institute

Law enforcement has been at the center of federal spending on criminal justice responses to drug use for decades. Leading national indicators of drug use and drug violations will show that 1) there is no clear relationship between drug arrests and drug use, and that 2) the impact of increased arrests, convictions and incarcerations of people for marijuana offenses has significant and measurable “collateral consequences” on communities and individuals.

The war on marijuana: The transformation of the war on drugs in the 1990s

Ryan S. King and Marc Mauer
Sentencing Project / Harm Reduction Journal

The results of this study suggest that law enforcement resources are not being effectively allocated to offenses which are most costly to society. The financial and personnel investment in marijuana offenses, at all points in the criminal justice system, diverts funds away from other crime types, thereby representing a questionable policy choice.

The Budgetary Implications of Marijuana Prohibition

Jeffrey A. Miron

This report examines the budgetary implications of legalizing marijuana – taxing and regulating it like other goods – in all fifty states and at the federal level.

The Budgetary Implications of Drug Prohibition

February 1, 2010
Jeffrey A. Miron
Criminal Justice Policy Foundation

The report estimates that legalizing drugs would save roughly $48.7 billion per year in government expenditure on enforcement of prohibition. $33.1 billion of this savings would accrue to state and local governments, while $15.6 billion would accrue to the federal government. Approximately $13.7 billion of the savings would results from legalization of marijuana, $22.3 billion from legalization of cocaine and heroin, and $12.8 from legalization of other drugs.

The Budgetary Impact of Ending Drug Prohibition

September 27, 2010
Jeffrey A. Miron and Katherine Waldock

State and federal governments in the United States face massive looming fiscal deficits. One policy change that can reduce deficits is ending the drug war. Legalization means reduced expenditure on enforcement and an increase in tax revenue from legalized sales.

One in 100: Behind Bars in America 2008

The PEW Center on the States

A new report by Pew's Public Safety Performance Project details how, for the first time in history, more than one in every 100 adults in America are in jail or prison—a fact that significantly impacts state budgets without delivering a clear return on public safety.

Syringe Exchange: An Effective Tool in the Fight Against HIV and Drug Abuse

January 1, 2009
Gay Men's Health Crisis

A report in favor of needle exchange programs as a way to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS and increase access to treatment.

Findings from the Evaluation of Vancouver’s Pilot Medically Supervised Safer Injecting Facility – Insite

June 1, 2009
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV / AIDS

 

In 2003, the regional health authority in Vancouver, Canada successfully applied to the federal government for a legal operating exemption to pilot North America’s first medically supervised injection facility (SIF) – Insite. This report provides a lay person’s description of the scientific evaluation of Insite, as well as summaries of the research findings related to its impact.

The Stigma of Substance Use: A Review of the Literature

August 18, 1999
Center for Addiction and Mental Health

A review of the literature on stigma with particular reference to stigma in selected groups of the substance using population.

Page 5 of 8
Syndicate content