Import Temp

Governor Vetoes Treatment-Instead-of-Incarceration Bill

Martinez Administration's Decision to Veto this Bill Fails to Capitalize on the Opportunity to Save the State Money and Protect New Mexico's Families and Children

Santa Fe - Today, Governor Martinez vetoed the Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act that was passed with overwhelming bi-partisan support.  If signed, the bill would have offered appropriate community-based treatment, instead of incarceration, for non-violent drug possession offenders and people with drug-related probation or parole violations.

Thousands of New Mexicans called and emailed the Governor, telling their stories and asking her to treat addiction as a health issue, not a criminal one.

"I know what it means to have an incarcerated parent.

Emily Kaltenbach at 505-920-5256 or Adriann Barboa at 505-379-1962

New Poll Finds Strong Majority of CA Voters Believe Too Many People Imprisoned, Favor Reducing Drug Possession Penalty from a Felony to a Misdemeanor

Voters More Likely to Vote for Candidates Who Support Reducing Drug Possession Penalty

Press Teleconference at 11 A.M. Will Review Survey Findings, Discuss Plans to Achieve Reform

Tony Newman at 646-335-5384 or Abel Haptegeorgis at 510.428.3939

Governor Martinez Has Only One More Day to Take Action on the Treatment-Instead-of-Incarceration Bill

If She Does Not Sign, She Will Divide Families, Increase Crime and Cost the State Millions

Santa Fe – Governor Martinez has yet to take action on the Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act that was passed with overwhelming bi-partisan support.  This bill proposes appropriate community-based treatment, instead of incarceration, for non-violent drug possession offenders and people with drug-related probation or parole violations.  

"Governor Martinez needs to make the right decision for New Mexico families and sign this bill." said Emily Kaltenbach, State Director for the Drug Policy Alliance of New Mexico.

Emily Kaltenbach at 505-920-5256

Gov. Brown Signs Bill to Shift Incarceration for Low-Level Felonies to Counties

Advocates Criticize Failure to Address Excessive Sentencing or Fund Drug, Mental Health Treatment and Other Prevention Services

Margaret Dooley-Sammuli at 213-291-4190

Thurs: Briefing on Capitol Hill Responds to Finding That "Drug Courts Are Not the Answer"

Martin Sheen and Others to Speak, Credit Drug Court with Saving Son Charlie Sheen's Life

Latest Analysis: Drug Courts Have Not Demonstrated Cost Savings, Reduced Incarceration or Improved Public Safety

Washington, D.C.

Tony Newman, DPA at 646-335-5384 or Jason Fenster, JPI at 202-558-7974 x 306

Stories and Photos from Families Who Have Been Impacted by Substance Abuse Will Be Delivered to Governor Martinez

Families Encourage Governor to Sign the Treatment-Instead-Of-Incarceration Legislation and Three Other Substance Use Treatment Bills

Santa Fe – At 2 pm this Friday, March 25th, stories and photos from women and families across New Mexico who have been impacted by substance use will be delivered to Governor Susana Martinez, at her office, to encourage her to sign a package of substance use treatment legislation aimed to treat addiction as a health issue, not a criminal one.

Emily Kaltenbach at 505-920-5256 or Adriann Barboa at 505-379-1962

Bill to End Racial Disparities in Connecticut Hits Governor's Desk

Community Organizations Call on Gov. Rell to Keep Her Word: “If I Hear of Racism Occurring in our State Government I will Take Swift Action”

Law that Would Fix Racist Crack and Powder Cocaine Disparities Awaits Her Signature

HARTFORD–Yesterday, a bill that would eliminate the disparity in Connecticut’s crack and powder cocaine law passed in the Senate, setting the stage for Governor M. Jodi Rell to sign it into law. Currently, it takes 28 grams (28g) of powder cocaine to trigger the same mandatory minimum sentence as only half a gram of crack, even though they are two forms of the same drug. According to the United States Sentencing Commisson’s 2002 Report, nearly 85% of persons convicted of crack cocaine penalties were black.
 

Robert Rooks at (203) 435-6979 or Michael Blain at (646) 335-2241

Advocates Settle Lawsuit on Voting Rights, Historic Voter Education Effort to Proceed in Alabama Prisons

Alabama Joins Only Vermont and Maine in Allowing Certain People to Vote While Incarcerated in State Prisons
Local and National Organizations Join the New Bottom Line Campaign to Enter Jails and Hit the Streets to Register Eligible Voters with Felony Convictions for Drug Possession

Yesterday, a settlement was reached between The Ordinary People's Society (TOPS) and the Alabama Department of Corrections, allowing Reverend Glasgow to resume his non-partisan ministry to register eligible voters currently incarcerated in the state's correctional facilities.

The lawsuit was filed after the Alabama Department of Corrections cancelled Reverend Glasgow's ministry following the Alabama Republican Party's objection to his voter education activities.

Ken Glasgow at 334-791-2433 or Gabriel Sayegh at 646-335-2264

Drug Czar Backs California Prison Guards, Opposes Unified Treatment Community

SACRAMENTO -- President George W. Bush's drug czar today announced his opposition to Proposition 5, the Nonviolent Offender Rehabilitation Act (NORA), which will expand access to drug treatment for young people and nonviolent offenders -- and make rehabilitation a priority of the state corrections system once again.

"The drug czar is going against the whole of California's treatment and prevention community to line up with law enforcement. We have tried incarceration as a primary response to addictive illness for decades and failed utterly," said Dr.

Margaret Dooley-Sammuli at (213) 291-4190 or Tommy McDonald at
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