Academic Journal Article

Editorial in Support of Expanded Access to Opioid Overdose Intervention in Annals of Internal Medicine

December 31, 2012

Expanded Access to Opioid Overdose Intervention: Research, Practice and Policy Needs

Op-ed in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Prevention of Fatal Overdose

November 14, 2012

This op-ed by Dr. Josiah Rich, Dr. Alexander Walley and Prof. Leo Beletsky, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, decribes the opioid overdose public health crisis and outlines solutions inlcuding naloxone distribution and education.

Study on the Cost Effectiveness of Distributing Naloxone, Summary

January 1, 2013

Summary of study on the cost-effectiveness of distributing naloxone published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Finds that distributing naloxone to heroin users to reverse overdose would be well within the range that U.S. society is typically willing to pay for health treatments. 

Study on the Cost Effectiveness of Distributing Naloxone, Published in Annals of Internal Medicine

January 1, 2013

Study on the cost-effectiveness of distributing naloxone published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Naloxone distribution was found to be cost-effective and that distributing naloxone to heroin users to reverse overdose would be well within the range that U.S. society is typically willing to pay for health treatments.

Study on the Impact of Overdose Education and Naloxone distribution in Massachusetts

January 1, 2013

This study published in BMJ looks at the impact of state-supported overdose education and nasal naloxone distribution (OEND) programs on rates of opioid-related death from overdose and acute care utilization in Massachusetts.  It finds that opioid overdose death rates were reduced in communities where OEND was implemented.

Initial evaluation of the impact of Washington's 911 Good Samaritan Law

November 1, 2011

Initial findings of a study on the implementation of Washington's 911 Good Samaritan Law from the University of Washington's Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute. 88% of opiate users indicated that now that they were aware of the law they would be more likely to call 911 during future overdoses.

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