Medical Marijuana

One of the most egregious outcomes of marijuana prohibition is that many sick people cannot legally access the medicine that works best for them. For many seriously ill people, medical marijuana is the only medicine that relieves their pain and suffering, or treats symptoms of their medical condition, without debilitating side effects. Marijuana has been shown to alleviate symptoms of a huge variety of serious medical conditions including cancer, AIDS, and glaucoma, and is often an effective alternative to synthetic painkillers. 

Medical Marijuana Access and Research 

Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia have passed medical marijuana laws legalizing the use and production of medical marijuana for qualifying patients under state law. However, the medical use of marijuana remains illegal under federal law, and patients in the remaining states are without any legal access at all.  Even in states where medical marijuana laws exist, patients and providers are vulnerable to arrest and interference from federal law enforcement.  
 
Marijuana prohibition has also thwarted research within the United States to uncover the best and most effective uses for marijuana as a medicine, making efforts to reform medical marijuana laws particularly difficult.
 
DPA played a primary role in the passage of medical marijuana laws in nine states, starting with California’s Proposition 215 in 1996. We seek to implement medical marijuana programs in additional states and to expand existing programs to better protect patients’ rights and to improve patient access to their medicine.  
 
The Drug Policy Alliance is committed to increasing the number of states with medical marijuana laws, supporting and improving existing state medical marijuana programs, protecting medical marijuana patients, and ending the federal ban on medical marijuana so that all patients within the United States have safe access to quality medicine and research into marijuana’s medicinal benefits can move forward. 

D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals Rules that DEA Does Not Have to Reconsider Marijuana's Schedule I Status

DPA Statement: Feds Are Creating a Catch-22 For Research and Policy

On Tuesday, January 22, 2013, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled in a case challenging the Drug Enforcement Administration’s designation of marijuana as a Schedule I substance.  The court was to decide whether the DEA followed its own rules when making the decision not to review scientific evidence that supports removing marijuana from Schedule I. Today, the court ruled that the DEA did adhere to their rules and did not have to reconsider the scheduling of marijuana.

Contact: Tony Newman 646-335-5384 or Tommy McDonald 510-229-5215

First N.J. Medical Marijuana Alternative Treatment Center to Open Today in Montclair

Patients and Advocates Overjoyed to Have Safe and Legal Access to Medical Marijuana

Contact: Tony Newman 646-335-5384 or Meagan Glaser 609-496-3497

Colorado Amendment 64

November 6, 2012

This is the law that was passed by the voters in Colorado legalizing and regulating marijuana.

Washington I-502

November 6, 2012

This is the law that was passed by the voters in Washington State legalizing and regulating marijuana.

New Mexico Department of Health’s Medical Cannabis Medical Advisory Board Unanimously Recommends to Keep PTSD as a Qualifying Condition

The Final Decision Rests in the Hands of the Acting Secretary of Health

(Santa Fe, NM) – Today, the New Mexico’s Medical Cannabis Program’s Medical Advisory Board unanimously recommended to the Acting Secretary of Health to keep PTSD as qualifying condition and to deny Dr. William Ulwelling’s petition to remove PTSD from the list of eligible medical conditions for enrollment in the program. The Secretary of Health will have the final decision.

Contact:  Emily Kaltenbach 505-920-5256

Medical Cannabis Patients, including Montel Williams, Oppose Petition to Withdraw PTSD as a Qualifying Condition in New Mexico

New Mexico Department of Health’s Medical Cannabis Medical Advisory Board Will Hear the Petition, Tomorrow, in Santa Fe

Psychiatrists, Military Veterans and Other Patients Scheduled to Testify at the Hearing, Asking the Governor and the Secretary of Health Not to Take Away Their Medicine

(Santa Fe, NM) – Tomorrow, from 1 to 5 pm, the New Mexico’s Medical Cannabis Program’s Medical Advisory Board will hold a public hearing to consider Dr. William Ulwelling’s petition to remove PTSD from the list of eligible medical conditions for enrollment in the program. The hearing is scheduled in the Harold Runnels Building’s auditorium, 1190 St. Francis Drive in Santa Fe.  The Secretary of Health will have the final decision.

Contact:  Emily Kaltenbach 505-920-5256

Don't Take Away our Medicine!

October 25, 2012

A campaign to protect safe access to medical marijuana for PTSD patients

Patients, Physicians and Advocates Launch Campaign to Protect Patients with PTSD Access to Medical Cannabis

Continued access to medicine is being threatened by a request to withdraw PTSD as a qualifying condition for the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program

Military veterans and other patients to petition the Governor and the Secretary of Health - Don’t Take Away Our Medicine.

Contact:  Emily Kaltenbach 505-920-5256

Medical Marijuana Advocates Mount Challenge to Schedule I Designation

Tues: U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit Will Hear Oral Arguments

DPA Statement: Feds’ Claim of “No Medical Use” Ignores Science

On Tuesday, October 16, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit will hear oral arguments in a case challenging the Drug Enforcement Administration’s decision to designate marijuana as a Schedule I substance. Schedule I is the most restrictive category for controlled substances, including those drugs defined as having a high potential for abuse, no currently accepted medical use, and a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision.

Tony Newman (646) 335-5384 or Tommy McDonald 510-229-5215

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