California

Tuesday November 4th is Election Day, and there are some VERY important drug policy reform issues to vote for…or against in California.

Most importantly, vote YES on Proposition 47 to end felony sentencing for people charged with simple drug possession in California. This is our opportunity to end felonies for simple drug possession and other petty crimes in California and every vote is needed to achieve victory. From polling, we know that a huge majority of Californians support this reform, so it all comes down to whether we turn out to vote. 

We are also urging you to vote NO on Proposition 46, the “Drug and Alcohol Testing of Doctors, Medical Negligence Lawsuits Initiative Statute.” Of greatest concern is that Prop 46 requires drug and alcohol testing of doctors and reporting of positive test results to the California Medical Board. Additionally it requires the California Medical Board to suspend any doctor that tests positive, pending investigation of the positive test result, and to take disciplinary action if the doctor was impaired while on duty and requires doctors to report any other doctor suspected of alcohol or other drug impairment or medical negligence. Learn more about why DPA says NO on Proposition 46.

Depending on where you live in California, you have the opportunity to vote for one of our drug policy champions in the U.S. Congress, such as Reps Barbara Lee, Dana Rohrabacher, Sam Farr, or Tony Cardenas. For details see the Drug Policy Action 2014 Drug Policy Reform Congressional Voter Guide, which grades members of Congress on how they voted on seven key drug policy reform votes in the U.S. House of Representatives in 2013 and 2014.

What you Need to Know to Vote:

If you have a vote-by-mail ballot, it has to be RECEIVED by your county elections office by 8:00pm on election night, November 4. So if you plan to mail in your ballot, be sure to mail it by Friday October 31 to ensure it is received by the deadline. You can also drop off your vote-by-mail ballot in-person at your county elections office or any polling place in your county before 8:00 pm on Election Day. If you do not have a vote-by-mail ballot, vote in-person at your polling place on November 4 from 7:00am - 8:00pm. Find your polling place here.

Now it’s time to cast your vote to end felony sentencing for simple drug possession, stop baseless drug testing, and support the courageous drug policy reform champions in Congress.

Please make sure your friends, your family, and everyone you know does the same! Share this page to help us spread the word and write or call your friends telling them why you support Proposition 47 and remind them to vote.

Together, we will win on Election Day!

Gov. Brown Backs Long-Sought Criminal Justice Realignment to Protect Public Safety and California Tax Dollars

Advocates Commend Strategy to Reduce Victimization and Expensive Incarceration for Low-Level Offenses

SACRAMENTO – In his proposed 2011-12 state budget released today, Governor Jerry Brown is urging structural changes to the state's corrections system that advocates say will reduce both crime and waste. The proposals include authorizing counties to handle people convicted of "nonviolent, non-serious, non-sex offenses, and without any previous convictions for such offenses," according to budget documents.

Margaret Dooley-Sammuli at 213-291-4190 or Tommy McDonald at 510-229-5215

California Drug Policy Heroes and Zeroes

November 10, 2005
Backes, Glenn and Leverenz, Nikos
Commissioned by the Drug Policy Alliance

Evaluation of members of the California Legislature is based on several criteria. Chief among them is whether a member has a consistent voting record for legislation that has a positively impact on drug policy in California. However, other factors were also considered, including significant signal of political courage in support of common-sense reforms.

Proposition 36: Improving Lives, Delivering Results

March 31, 2006
Drug Policy Alliance

This report is intended to help California state and county officials understand the positive impact of the historic Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act of 2000 on California’s correctional system, drug treatment centers, and state budget over its first four years. This report also introduces readers to some inspiring true stories of how Prop 36 has helped tens of thousands of people turn their lives around.

Targeting Blacks for Marijuana: Possession Arrests of African Americans in California, 2004-08

June 29, 2010
Levine, Harry G., et al.

The Drug Policy Alliance, the nation's leading organization advocating alternatives to the war on drugs, has released a report that documents widespread race-based disparities in the enforcement of low-level marijuana possession laws in California. Focused on the 25 largest counties in the state, the report finds that African Americans are arrested for marijuana possession at substantially higher rates than whites, typically at double, triple or even quadruple the rate of whites.

Arresting Blacks for Marijuana in California: Possession Arrests, 2006-08

October 2, 2010
Levine, Harry G., et al.

The Drug Policy Alliance and the California State Conference of the NAACP have released a report that documents widespread race-based disparities in the enforcement of low-level marijuana possession laws in California. In the last 20 years, California made 850,000 arrests for possession of small amounts of marijuana, and half a million arrests in the last 10 years. The people arrested were disproportionately African Americans and Latinos, overwhelmingly young people, especially young men. Yet, U.S.

Arresting Latinos for Marijuana in California: Possession Arrests in 33 Cities, 2006-08

October 2, 2010
Levine, Harry G., et al.
Drug Policy Alliance

The Drug Policy Alliance and the William C. Velasquez Institute have released a report that documents widespread race-based disparities in the enforcement of low-level marijuana possession laws in California. In the last 20 years, California made 850,000 arrests for possession of small amounts of marijuana, and half a million arrests in the last 10 years. The people arrested were disproportionately African Americans and Latinos, overwhelmingly young people, especially young men. Yet, U.S.

Page 12 of 12
Syndicate content