How does your state measure up when it comes to establishing policies that reduce the harms of both drug use and drug prohibition?

Harm Reduction

Does the state permit access to clean syringes for people who inject drugs?

  • YES

Does the state have naloxone training & distribution programs available to the public at syringe exchange programs or other facilities?

  • NO

Does the state have a 911 Good Samaritan law?

  • NO

Does the state have legal methadone access?

  • YES


Are marijuana possession and use legal for medical purposes?

  • YES

Is there a government-regulated distribution system for medical marijuana?

  • YES

More information on medical marijuana:

What are the criminal penalties for marijuana possession?

Criminal Justice

How many people are arrested for a drug offense each year? 

  • 16,365

What are the racial disparities in arrest rates?

  • Total population (2011): white: 77.6%, black: 9.5%.
    Drug Arrests (2011): 68.7% white, 28.3% black.

What happens to people’s voting rights when they become part of the criminal justice system?

  • The vote is automatically restored to all persons convicted of a non-violent felony after the sentence completion. Persons convicted of a violent felony and all second- time felony offenders (whether violent or non-violent) are not automatically re-enfranchised.

Nevada Passes Bill to Prevent Overdose Deaths

Advocates and Family Members Who Lost Loved Ones to Overdose Applaud Life-Saving Legislation

Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act Expected to be Signed Into Law by Governor Sandoval Today

Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval is expected to sign SB 459, the Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act, into law today. This bill will provide protection to those who call for help in an overdose emergency, while also expanding access to the overdose antidote, naloxone.


Tony Newman 646-335-5384
Jerónimo Saldaña 917-410-1270

TODAY: Nevada State Senate to Hold the First-ever Legislative Hearing in the U.S. on Heroin-assisted Treatment

International Experts to Testify on Incontrovertible Scientific Evidence Demonstrating Heroin-assisted Treatment is a Feasible, Proven, and Cost-Effective Intervention

Today, the Nevada State Senate will hold the first-ever legislative hearing on heroin-assisted treatment. Senate Bill 275, which would establish a four-year pilot program, will be heard in the Revenue and Economic Development Committee at 3:30 p.m. today.

Heroin-assisted treatment, also known as heroin maintenance, is an effective, and cost-saving strategy for reducing drug use and drug-related harm among long-term heroin users for whom other treatment programs, like residential rehabilitation or methadone, have failed.


Lindsay LaSalle 510-847-8064
Tommy McDonald 510-338-8827

Nevada State Senate to Consider Groundbreaking Heroin-assisted Treatment Program

Senate Bill 275 Would Create a Four-year Pilot Program

Heroin-assisted Treatment Programs Have Proven Successful in Reducing Overdoses, Disease and Crime in Numerous Countries, Including Germany, UK, Spain, Canada and more

Last week, Nevada State Senator Richard Segerblom introduced groundbreaking legislation, Senate Bill 275, which creates a four-year heroin-assisted treatment pilot project.

Heroin-assisted treatment, also known as heroin maintenance, refers to the supervised administration by a doctor of pharmaceutical-grade heroin (diacetylmorphine) to a small group of chronic heroin users who have failed more traditional forms of treatment including abstinence-based models and medication such as methadone. 


Lindsay LaSalle 510-847-8064
Tony Newman 646-335-5384

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid: Marijuana Has Medical Value and Marijuana Possession Arrests are Waste of Law Enforcement Time and Resources

Statement from Drug Policy Alliance: More Senators Should Follow Reid’s Lead

In an interview today with the Las Vegas Sun, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) said Nevada cities should move in the direction of making medical marijuana legal.

“If you’d asked me this question a dozen years ago, it would have been easy to answer – I would have said no, because (marijuana) leads to other stuff,” the Senate majority leader told the Sun today. “But I can’t say that anymore.”

Contact: Tony Newman 646-335-5384 or Bill Piper 202-669-6430

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